Plastisol Ink

General Information about Screen Printing Plastisol Inks

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General Information about Screen Printing Plastisol Inks

General Information about Screen Printing Plastisol InksThe most popular ink used in the garment printing industry is Plastisol ink. Screen printing plastisol ink is easy to print with, does not dry in the screen, is opaque on dark garments, and features great adhesion to t-shirts, athletic jerseys, hoodies, heat transfers, and most textiles in general.Plastisols are made up of two primary ingredients - PVC resin (a white powder) and plasticizer (a thick, clear liquid). Plastisol ink will not dry, or cure, at normal temperatures. They must be exposed at a temperature around 300 - 330º F (143-166º C) to be...

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FastFilms™ Mesh Suggestions

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FastFilms™ Screen Printing Mesh Suggestions Multi-Tech’s FastFilms™ Ink Series is a premium plastisol formulated specifically to match the Pantone® colors specified by Scott Fresener’s FastFilms™ separation plug-in for Photoshop. They will work wet-on-wet on automatic or manual presses. The semi-opaque formulation is specifically designed to provide cleaner/brighter inks with higher pigment loading for brilliant color, a soft-hand feel with a smooth finish. It is exceptionally fast-flashing and is ready for use right out of the bucket. In addition, it has an exceptionally long shelf life.Read more FastFilm Ink InformationTo purchase a FastFilms ink textile ink visit our supplies eStore Colors...

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How To Make Friendlier Inks

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How To Make Friendlier Inks

How To Make Your Inks More Friendlyby Roger L. JenningsDownload Full PDF Article...Have you ever opened a can of plastisol ink to find it thick and gummy like peanut butter? Such ink will not pass easily through the screen printing mesh, and will wear you out printing, but they can be converted quickly to easier to print inks.Handling Stiff Plastisol InkStir and print a soft-hand ink (also known as base, extender base and other terms); there is no pigment in such ink, and it will stir and print very easily. Next, stir and print a process plastisol ink. Again, the ink...

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Foil Transfers Tutorial

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Foil Transfers Tutorial

Heat Transfer Foils TutorialDownload Full PDF Article This document lays out the steps and setting used for garment printing using the foil transfer technique. These settings are only suggestions. There are many different foils on the market, different plastisols and many different final applications. Consider purchasing our transfer foils to better replicate our results. ALWAYS PRETEST BEFORE ANY APPLICATION! Suggested Settings: Screen Mesh: 60 to 110 Monofilament Heat Transfer Press Specifications: 350°F, 50-60 lbs. pressure, 10-20 seconds Ink: A fast fusing plastisol with lower re-melt properties is desired. (Multi-Tech MC 107 Flash Base performs wonderfully.) Instructions Print the desired image...

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Eliminate Fibrillation

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Eliminate Fibrillation

Eliminate Fibrillation (or, "Having Fun with Fibers")by Rick RothClick here for PDF Version of Elimitnate FibrillationFibrillation is defined as the rapid, irregular, and unsynchronized contraction of the muscle fibers of the heart. We aren’t talking about that type of fibrillation in this article, although many a screen printer has felt like he was going to have a heart attack over the type of fibrillation that we are going to talk about in this article. Fibrillation in screen printing is when the fibers of a shirt stick through the ink deposit, giving a shirt, post-washing, a faded or even hairy look....

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